excerpts from “Road deaths, cancer and diabetes becoming Africa’s hidden epidemics” by Oliver Balch

“accidents on the road are expected to become the biggest killer of children between five and 15 by 2015, outstripping malaria and Aids.”

‘The poorest communities often live alongside the fastest roads, their children may need to negotiate the most dangerous routes to school and they may have poorer outcomes from injuries, due to limited access to post-crash emergency healthcare,’ the report says.

Aside from the obvious distress caused by accidents, sub-Saharan Africa’s high-risk roads have a significant economic impact too. Crashes are estimated to cost African countries between 1 and 3% of their GNP each year, the report finds.”

 

“The shift towards urbanisation is a case in point. City residents typically take less exercise, triggering diabetes and cardiovascular problems. Rising incomes are driving demand for processed foods that are higher in sugar, fat and salt. The same factors result in increased car use and ownership, and more traffic accidents.

Alcohol consumption links the two. Though seven in 10 adults abstain from drinking alcohol in sub-Saharan Africa, those who do have the highest prevalence of heavy episodic drinking globally, the report says.”

 

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2013/aug/05/road-deaths-cancer-diabetes-africa?utm_content=bufferf6163&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Buffer

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